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Topic: Keeping track of where you are (Read 12344 times) previous topic - next topic

Keeping track of where you are
The measure count is a handy feature, but when you are far into a score, it's sometimes easier to have a visible count from the preceding rehearsal letter, particularly when determining where to place system breaks when you have repetitive bars.

I use a separate staff with text-based numbers in each bar.  Each bar consists of hidden rests with a text-entry number from 1 to n (n is the number of bars in each section).

Usually each section will be a standard length, after the intro.  Create the first n bars, finish the n-th bar with a double bar line, then just copy/paste the section until you have enough to carry you through the job.

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  • Marsu
  • Virtuoso
Re: Keeping track of where you are
Reply #1
good idea, David! :)

...And do not forget to hide that staff when releasing the file publicly, too ;)

Re: Keeping track of where you are
Reply #2
In case anyone's interested, I have a very low-tech way to see where I am when enteringparts for the purpose of practice.

Following an earlier suggestion (Sorry - I forget by whom), I tend to enter the lyrics for the part I'm entering before the notes. In order to go back and edit the inevitable typos, I make sure to hit ENTER before typing in the text for a new system. Since I tend to be entering baroque of classical music, the lyrics do tend to get repetitive. This makes it still hard to see where I am, so each time I get to the words on a new page, I prefix the first word with the new page number. It ends up looking like this:

si-cut e-rat in prin-ci-pi-o
11in prin-ci-pi-o etc.

Re: Keeping track of where you are
Reply #3
Et nunc et semper!
Yes, good idea. I have done something like this before: simply throw in a few numbers (lyric line numbers), and 'glue' them to the first syllable of the line. When you're done, throw the numbers out again.

On my bike to work (in the snow!) this morning, I thought of a Latin joke.
"Et lux perpetua luceat f "
in Dutch, every sharp note has the same name as the note, with 'is' as suffix. Thus, a# = ais, b# = bis, ... , e# = eis. Since eis is enharmonically equal to f...
bad, huh?

Rob.

Re: Keeping track of where you are
Reply #4
In case anyone's interested, I have a very low-tech way to see where I am when enteringparts for the purpose of practice.

Following an earlier suggestion (Sorry - I forget by whom), I tend to enter the lyrics for the part I'm entering before the notes. In order to go back and edit the inevitable typos, I make sure to hit ENTER before typing in the text for a new system. Since I tend to be entering baroque of classical music, the lyrics do tend to get repetitive. This makes it still hard to see where I am, so each time I get to the words on a new page, I prefix the first word with the new page number. It ends up looking like this:

si-cut e-rat in prin-ci-pi-o
11in prin-ci-pi-o etc.

I do something similar except I keep both the numbered text and un-numbered text in the lyric area.  When all mistakes are taken out, I copy everything to the clipboard where a script, envoked with a shortcut key, strips off all digits.  This is pasted in front of the numbered text.  If I can use (most of) the text in another part, I copy the numbered text only.
Since 1998

Re: Keeping track of where you are
Reply #5
I just add 4 0r 5 barlines and it easy to locate where i am in the score

Rik