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Topic: tempo track examples (Read 632 times) previous topic - next topic

tempo track examples
In a previous post on swing tempo, this was posted:

If you use NWC to print parts, the Tempo track is indespensible.  Things that all parts need to see like rehearsal symbols and tempo are all on a staff that is layered into the part you are currently printing.

Could I see some examples of what that track might look like?

Re: tempo track examples
Reply #1
Take a look at EineKlein1 Look at it viewer mode and it looks like an ordinary conductor's score. Hide all but one string part and you are ready to print that part.

Also, check out this User Tip.
Since 1998

Re: tempo track examples
Reply #2
This will definitely save time. I've been putting a lot of duplicate information in all the staves. How important is it for this tempo stave to be just one line? It it's going to be invisible, and layered, does it matter?

Re: tempo track examples
Reply #3
In 2010 I wrote a guide on how to create lead sheets that might be helpful.  Please note there are some techniques discussed that are no longer necessary, like using Global_Mod to move the rest part of a restchord off the page - the rest can now be hidden in the restchord properties dialogue.

Go to https://nwc-scriptorium.org/helpful.html#Explanations and look for "Lead Sheets in NWC2.pdf"

Since writing this document user objects have appeared too, and would change how'd I'd do a few things, but the fundamental techniques remain the same.

Note also that there's no reason not to have a separate tempo layer and use 3 layers so you can have the tempo related symbols separate from the lyrics and chords...  Or whatever arrangement your imagination can come up with.
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - gonna lern tubies next

Re: tempo track examples
Reply #4
One or more layered "conductor" staffs are handy, but you have to be careful what you write in them doesn't collide with the notes in the staffs they're printed with. Flute and piccolo parts are an example of leger line notes that will create mischief when you add text above the conductor staff for something like "Allegro ma non troppo," or you include the title of the upcoming section of a medley.

Similarly, if you add markings below the layered staff, those will collide with leger lines for instruments like bass clarinet, which often go down to written C below middle C.

Multibar rests can be tricky too, since the conductor staff MBRs will have to match the MBRs used in the part you're going to print.  A kludge for that would be to have several conductor staffs, each configured to match certain the instrumental parts.   It only takes a couple of seconds to make copies of the primary conductor staff, then you can change the copies as needed. 

One might say "why bother?" but it's still going to make life easier to have a few customized conductor staffs than entering a whole bunch of otherwise identical marking on every staff in your score.

Re: tempo track examples
Reply #5
This will definitely save time. I've been putting a lot of duplicate information in all the staves. How important is it for this tempo stave to be just one line? It it's going to be invisible, and layered, does it matter?
The ONLY thing that will show will be tempo indications and rehearsal symbols. My example from my user tip contains five lines.
You might want to install my Multi Measure Rest script from wjporter.com/nwc on the tempo track and select "Layer Hide". The MMRs from the tempo track won't appear and won't interfere when an instrument has an MMR.
Since 1998