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Topic: Alt+0255 instead of underscore (Read 5944 times) previous topic - next topic

Alt+0255 instead of underscore
In lyrics Alt+255 does the same as underscore shown as space when it is checked. When you have unchecked this item then you can use Alt+255 instead.
  • Last Edit: 2014-04-27 05:42 pm by Koorpartijen

Re: Alt+0255 instead of underscore
Reply #1
I think you mean Alt+255 rather than Alt+0255
Alt+255 is interpreted as a no break space, the same as using Alt+0160
Alt+0255 usually produces ink or causes pixels to be set.
Registered user since 1996

Re: Alt+0255 instead of underscore
Reply #2
Alt-255 used to be good fun in the Dos-days.
In modern Dos-boxes it does not work anymore: you could have a file like Holy<alt-255>Cow.txt which showed in the directory as "Holy Cow.txt" - and nobody could find it.
Worse still, a filename could consist of a single Alt-255 - and you would hardly notice it.

But hey, old hat - and a discarded hat, at that.

Having said that, 255 (as the highest possible number in 16 bits) may still serve as a special character, and you have found it.
Alt-0255 is quite different: a 4-digit code denotes a Unicode character.
For instance, Alt-128 is simply a character of the old Dos Ascii-set, whereas Alt-0128 is the Euro-symbol €. Hey.

Well, that's about enough for a side note.

Re: Alt+0255 instead of underscore
Reply #3
Having said that, 255 (as the highest possible number in 16 bits) may still serve as a special character, and you have found it.
I think you mean 8 bits.
Registered user since 1996

Re: Alt+0255 instead of underscore
Reply #4
I think you mean 8 bits.

So true... or else it would be 65535 (unsigned integer)

Re: Alt+0255 instead of underscore
Reply #5
Welcome back, Rob!

Long time no seen...
Always look on the bright side of life!

Re: Alt+0255 instead of underscore
Reply #6
Alt-255 used to be good fun in the Dos-days.
In modern Dos-boxes it does not work anymore: you could have a file like Holy<alt-255>Cow.txt which showed in the directory as "Holy Cow.txt" - and nobody could find it.
Worse still, a filename could consist of a single Alt-255 - and you would hardly notice it.

But hey, old hat - and a discarded hat, at that.

Having said that, 255 (as the highest possible number in 16 bits) may still serve as a special character, and you have found it.
Alt-0255 is quite different: a 4-digit code denotes a Unicode character.
For instance, Alt-128 is simply a character of the old Dos Ascii-set, whereas Alt-0128 is the Euro-symbol €. Hey.

Well, that's about enough for a side note.
It might make for a good character to use in a password (if you don't forget it).