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Topic: Grace notes at 100% accuracy (Read 13771 times) previous topic - next topic

Grace notes at 100% accuracy
Grace notes become wild when there are to many of them.

Here's a solution: Add as much grace notes as possible, then mute them, then "copy and paste" and finally... change the grace notes (you copied and pasted) to normal ones and put their visibilty at "never".

There's an attachment.


Oh... but time signatures must be changed and hidden.

Re: Grace notes at 100% accuracy
Reply #1
An alternative is a pair of staves: Played & hidden along with the Muted & displayed.  This gives maximum control as to when the notes are actually sounded.  In the attachment the note on the 2nd beat stays on the 2nd beat while the grace notes take time from the end of the 1st beat.
Since 1998

Re: Grace notes at 100% accuracy
Reply #2
An alternative is a pair of staves: Played & hidden along with the Muted & displayed.

Do you think it would be very tiring to have all of that for an orchestrial score? Basically have every instrument own another staff to do the "grace notes accuracy thing".

Re: Grace notes at 100% accuracy
Reply #3
It never hurts to have a variety of arrows in your quiver.  The user has to decide on the importance of appearance, quality of playback, and time (and/or interest) available to work on it.  What you would do for a small ensemble may not be what you would do for a full orchestra.
Since 1998

Re: Grace notes at 100% accuracy
Reply #4
I'm just completing a score for flute, viola and harp. The printout will have four staves (one each for the flute and viola and two for the harp). The raw score has, by actual count, thirteen staves. This includes hidden staves for special playback effects and layered staves for accurate printout. There are some on this forum who would probably look at the score and say I had used too few extra staves - and they might be right, in that I could gain a little bit better looking printout if I used a few more. You make your choice based on how accurate you wish to be, or how the score is going to be used, or how obsessive-compulsive your personality is. Personally, I am very grateful for the ability to layer and hide staves, and the flexibility it gives us in scoring. Since you can copy a whole staff in one operation, I don't find it that difficult to add the necessary extra staves.

But maybe I'm just showing my age. I remember the days of vellum paper, cartographer's pens, glass-fiber erasers, Pounce, and the LeRoy lettering system. Scores are so much easier now.....(thanks, Eric!)

Cheers,

Bill