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Topic: How to make a set of single staffs? (Read 3663 times) previous topic - next topic

How to make a set of single staffs?
L. S.!

How to make a set of single staffs?
When I want to make e. g. a set of 10 musical exercises, I do not wish to make one score with different staffs.
Who gives me a hint?

Thanks in advance.

Gr.

Mazzltov


 

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #1
Mazzltov

I am not sure that I understand what you want to do.
Are you asking for one nwc file with one staff, split into 10 different exercises such that each excercise will print out on a separate piece of A4 paper (for example)?

Please can you clarify.
Rich.

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #2
If what you are trying to do is to create ten separate short NWC files and then print them all out on one page, using only NWC, you can't.

However, you can create the ten separate exercises as ten separate sections of a single staff, and then arrange the printing so that each exercise prints out on a separate line. Here's how:

Write the exercises as a continuous line of music. Then, working one exercise at a time:

  • select the barline between one exercise and the next.
  • press <alt><enter> to bring up the barline properties box
  • change the barline type to "section close" and click the checkbox beside "forced system break."
  • move on to the end of the next exercise and repeat the process.

When you have modified all exercise-separating barlines in this manner, NWC will print out each exercise on its own line.

This won't work for exercises with more than one staff. The only solution for those is to save the exercises separately as graphics files (this is done with the "copy" button on the print preview page) and then cut-and-paste them together in a graphics program or a graphics-friendly word processor such as Microsoft Word.

Hope this helps...

Bill

<edit> corrected a couple of errors in syntax (the writer in me coming out....)
  • Last Edit: 2008-09-26 04:45 pm by William Ashworth

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #3
Attached is a set of left hand limbering-stretching exercises for the violin. As William mentioned, each one is separated from the next by a Forced System Break.  HTH
Since 1998

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #4
Possible bug?  I was going to steal Warren's exercises, but wanted them an octave higher.  I cheated by using transpose +12 semitones.  The sharps for the key signature disappeared, and the key became C major (a hidden natural sign on top line F)!  Then I saw also that all the 4th line D's had accidental sharps. 

Quote
This won't work for exercises with more than one staff.
It will.  See attached (thanks, Warren).  Pardon any discords; I didn't check for them, just wanted to illustrate the idea.




Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #5
I would not count this as a bug.  The "Key Signature" is user defined (C# plus a D#) and does not naturally occur in Western music.

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #6
Quote from: David Palmquist
It will.  See attached (thanks, Warren).  Pardon any discords; I didn't check for them, just wanted to illustrate the idea.

Of course it will. I've done it any number of times in exactly this way. I don't know where my head was this morning - probably concentrating on the hip I injured yesterday. Thanks for the catch, David

Cheers,

Bill

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #7
Possible bug? 

I misunderstood the way you were achieving the transpose.  I thought you were saying that you used the staff transpose (Staff Properties / Instrument).
Now that would have been a bug.  However after trying this in varied ways and not reproducing your observations, I realised that you meant  Tools Transpose Staff.  After trying this, I see what you are saying.

However, I agree with Michael that this is not a bug since the original key sig is non standard.  This effect is not displayed when a standard key sig is used (D Major with 2 sharps for example)

The way to resolve it, of course, is after the transpose, edit the key sig end enter back the non standard key ( c and D) and then audit accidentals.


Rich.

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #8
Yes, well...it would have helped if I'd actually read the key signature.  How soon we forget our music lessons from so many years ago.

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #9
The way to resolve it, of course, is after the transpose, edit the key sig end enter back the non standard key ( c and D) and then audit accidentals.
Easier to just Select All then Ctrl+Shift+Up 7 times.

I'm amazed that NWC supports user defined KeySigs. I know that implictly they exist, but I've never seen any music that uses one. Anyone know of a link to any scanned music? I'd like to try reading it.
Registered user since 1996

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #10
Bartok's work contains huge amounts of non-standard key signatures.  I just tried to scan the first one I found, but my scanner doesn't want to work.  I'll get back to you later.

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #11
Here's a very simple scanned nonstandard (I think) key signature from Bartok's Mikrokosmos Volume 3, #89 (In Four Parts).  The key signature is C and G sharp, with no F at the beginning.  The book also contains many key signatures with the F for the F sharp on the bottom space F.

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #12
Easier to just Select All then Ctrl+Shift+Up 7 times.

I'm amazed that NWC supports user defined KeySigs. I know that implictly they exist, but I've never seen any music that uses one. Anyone know of a link to any scanned music? I'd like to try reading it.
This was the first time I ever had to use a non standard key signature.  By shifting the hand down a half step (keeps the open G string as natural), Eb would work.  The exercise is based on what a teacher gave me in 1994.
Since 1998

Re: How to make a set of single staffs?
Reply #13
Re nonstandard key signatures: they're actually common in eastern European folk music (which Bartok was emulating in much of his work). Transcribing Greek or Bulgarian music, for example, you have the choice of using nonstandard sigs or using a lot of accidentals, and most collections use the nonstandard sigs.

Another use I have found for them is in writing harp music. Harp parts don't traditionally have nonstandard signatures; however, they do use accidentals in strange ways. Harpists never have more than seven pitch classes available at any one time, and they often have to utilize enharmonics in order to get some of the notes. (If a passage needs both E and Eb, for example, but not D, the D strings will be tuned to D#, and while the rest of the orchestra is playing E-C-Eb the harp is playing E-C-D#. This is reflected in the written music.) I find that if a long section of harp writing uses enharmonic tuning, the simplist way to write it is to throw in a nonstandard sig and just key in the notes. When I'm done, I force accidentals in the harp part, remove the nonstandard signature, audit accidentals, and everything falls neatly into place.

Cheers,

Bill