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Topic: To trumpets, clarinets and saxophones (Read 36387 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: To trumpets, clarinets and saxophones
Reply #50
They're broken.

Re: To trumpets, clarinets and saxophones
Reply #51
Didn't know clarinets have a G key as such.  Are you talking about the ring key used by the third finger of the right hand?

I assume by the Eb key you mean the 4th space Eb?  Or the first line Eb?  If the latter, there are 3 fingerings, one involving a ring key in the right hand, one involving the lowest sidekey, and the third being the little key that sits between the second and third finger holes.

Whatever, the keys may not be broken; they could be bent; you might not have correctly aligned the bridge; or the pads could be leaking.

When assembling the clarinet, always hold the keys of the upper joint down before placing it on the lower joint.  Then the key will clear the other half of the bridge.  If you don't do this, you risk damaging the instrument.

Re: To trumpets, clarinets and saxophones
Reply #52
Didn't know clarinets have a G key as such. Are you talking about the ring key used by the third finger of the right hand?

It's possible he might be talking about playing in actual concert pitch and thinking about the notes that way.  In which case the G key would be the contraption near the
top, above the top finger hole.  (i.e. A, as written)  And the Eb key could be the key played by the right pinky (F as written) in the lowest register.  Those keys are two of the most subject to problems; my G - er, A - key has a busted spring myself.

- seb

Re: To trumpets, clarinets and saxophones
Reply #53
I think you're reaching a bit, Steve, but you could be right about what Barbra is trying to say (grin).

The A key (concert G): - I've been playing clarinet for just about 40 years, and have seldom had a problem with it.  Where there is a problem, it's usually either a worn out pad or the adjustment screw for the G# key that crosses it needs to be turned a little.

The low F key is pretty solidly made too.  I guess it could go out of whack, but the horn would have to be abused big-time.  I can see the bridge key getting knocked out of whack if you forget to raise it when putting the upper and lower joints together, but most other keys on the standard soprano clarinets are pretty bulletproof.

That's not the same for a bass clarinet, because the keys and rods are longer, more susceptible to being bent and the linkages, designed by Rube Goldberg, are also easy to wreck.

By the way, what does Barbra mean by a "brack band?"