Skip to main content

Topic: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way) (Read 26116 times) previous topic - next topic

How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Rather than having to remember the formulas (and remembering how to use them), I came up with a way that is much easier, for me anyway:

This example is set at tempo = 160
Create a measure with 8 eighth rests in it.
Insert tempo marks before each eighth rest.
Before 1st, 3rd, 5th, & 7th eighth rests, set tempo to dotted-eighth = 160.
Before 2nd, 4th, 6th, & 8th eighth rests, set tempo to dotted-quarter = 160.
(I usually use Copy&Paste to do this more quickly.)
Then you can use either the local repeat feature or you can Copy&Paste as many measures as you need, in case you need one straight measure somewhere in there. For that measure, simply enter quarter-note = 160 at the beginning of the measure with no other tempo marks anywhere else in that measure.

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #1

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #2
The method proposed by K.A.T. is brilliant but can someone suggest how an drum part would be written to give the same result

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #3
G'day Snooker,
I'm not quite sure what you're asking...

Do you want the drum part to swing but without having a tempo track to make it happen?

FWIW, swing charts are normally written straight, with a directive to the musician to swing the quavers (8ths).  However, for the non-jazz musician, you could write the part in 12/8 and make the note values crotchet/quaver pairs instead of quaver/quaver pairs.  This would result in roughly the same feel.  Another method is to write in 4/4 with crotchet/quaver triplets. 

Ultimately though, these notation alternatives are much busier than they need to be.  Quaver/quaver pairs with a swing directive is far better.  For NWC, you then use one of the several methods for adjusting the playback speed, such as the method K.A.T. has presented, to get the audio playback to sound right while keeping the look right.



** Crotchet = 1/4, quaver = 1/8
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - gonna lern tubies next

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #4
Thanks Lawrie

Quaver quaver pairs make sense.
So in 4/4 time the bar would simply show eight quaver notes beamed in pairs with an instruction to swing.
Is this correct?

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #5
G'day Snooker,
yup, that's pretty much it.  You mightn't always have all the quavers beamed, E.G. the music might have a dotted crotchet followed by a quaver or the like.  Doesn't matter, the quavers still get swung.

If you look in my font suites you'll see a couple of swing symbols to make the printed directive easier.  Don't forget to make the tempo track do its thing or it won't sound right.
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - gonna lern tubies next

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #6
Thanks Lawrie

Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #7
Even though it's theoretically wrong in 4/4 time, you will often find the beams are in groups of four eighths in swing or other jazz notation.

Sammy Nestico's book suggests not beaming across beat 3 in 4/4 bars or across beat 2 in cut time bars.  That way the reading musician can always tell at a glance where the major subdivision is in the bar.

Nestico also recommends using tied eighth notes instead of a quarter note when crossing the major subdivision of a bar. So don't write the first bar, it's confusing.  The second bar is preferred.

!NoteWorthyComposerClip(2.0,Single)
|Note|Dur:8th|Pos:0
|Note|Dur:4th|Pos:0
|Note|Dur:4th|Pos:0!1
|Note|Dur:4th|Pos:0
|Note|Dur:8th|Pos:0
|Bar|Style:SectionClose
|Note|Dur:8th|Pos:0
|Note|Dur:4th|Pos:0
|Note|Dur:8th|Pos:0^!1
|Note|Dur:8th|Pos:0!1
|Note|Dur:4th|Pos:0
|Rest|Dur:8th
!NoteWorthyComposerClip-End


Re: How to Make NWC Play Jazz (Another Way)
Reply #8
I produced an Excel file some time ago which enables you to work out the settings for the Tempo multipoint controller to give the appropriate jazzy feel in playback. It is based on Marsu's original method, but the spreadsheet does the calculations for you.

It is in the Scripto at http://nwc-scriptorium.org/helpful.html#NWCFiles Scroll down to the bottom of the section and you will find a link to a file called Jazzyquavers.zip.

The file also works very well for giving a lilt to folk tunes, such as jigs and hornpipes. Quaver pairs in hornpipes are usually played dotted - approx 2:1 ratio and the first quaver of a quaver triplet in a jig is usually "lent on" a little borrowing some time from the middle one. The amount depends on the particular tradition, more in a Northumbrian jig than an Irish jig for example.

Geoff
Geoff Walker
Middlesbrough, UK