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Topic: thrill , getting louder , getting softer (Read 10175 times) previous topic - next topic

thrill , getting louder , getting softer
I wish to know how to do getting louder < or getting softer > sign and actually play it . Because i can't find it in anywhere . Oter than that,i was looking forward to do a thrill " tr~~ " . Can anybody teach me ??And , can noteworthy play this expresion " ^ " ?

Note that i am using nwc 1.70 ....is it possible to do what i want ???

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #1
Chew... before you do anything else, update your NWC to the current version 1.75. That way, when you get a reply (I myself do not know the answer), you will be able to do the same thing.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #2
Ok , before that , is 1.75 manage to do it ? or 1.70 is good enough to do sooooooooo ??

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #3
The signs < and > need to be added as text.
You may use a few different methods to accomplish the proper sound.
You may use a hidden dynamic variance, or a hidden MPC.
The tr~~~~~ (called a trill, not a thrill [unless it's played extremely well]) needs to be accomplished with hidden items as well.  The easiest way (for me) is to use a hidden staff with short notes that take up a lot of room,
and a visible muted staff with the single note and the tr~~~~~ inserted as text.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #4
To increase or decrease volume ( > < ) if you want the signs in the score you must put them in as text, but to do the actual increase and decrease you enter your starting level from the insert bar ( p, mp, f, ff, etc.) then insert a 'dynamic variance' from the 'insert' menu such as 'crescendo' or 'decrescendo' then enter your ending level.  NWC will ramp the volume up or down from the first to the second level.  By the by, it dosen't matter if you enter crescendo or decrescendo, your volume will still vary from the first level to the second.

Hope this helps - The Hankster

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #5
To increase or decrease volume ( > < )   should read
To increase or decrease volume ( < > )          or
To decrease or increase volume ( > < )

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #6
Chew, to use these signs "<" ">" (sometimes called "hairpins" in music terminology) you also need to download and install the "crescendo" font from the Scriptorium. If you know how to unzip and install windows font files the download link can be found here.

hth,

Bob

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #7
Dick,  I dunno if you are a member of the grammer police or what, but > means to increase and < means to decrease which is why I put them in that order.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #8
p < f : means (imho): increase volume from 'piano' to 'forte'
fff >f : means decrease volume from 'fortissimo possibile' to 'forte'

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #9
You are correct sir

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #10
Hmmmmmm...  so, a LESS THAN sign (<) means to increase and a GREATER THAN sign (>) means to DEcrease?  No wonder so few people major in both math and music.  How about p > f or ff < f ??

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #11
Hmmmmmm... so, a LESS THAN sign < means to increase and a GREATER THAN sign > means to DEcrease? No wonder so few people major in both math and music.

No, you're just looking at it wrong-way-to. In the case of the > (greater-than) symbol, the quantity on the left is greater than the quantity on the right. Musically it's the same. If we say f>p, the quantity on the left is still greater than the quantity on the right.

How about p > f or ff < f ??

Interestingly, this is possible in NWC, even though it doesn't make much sense musically or mathematically. It's like saying 3 > 7 or 14 < 7.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #12
I believe those symbols were used in music BEFORE they were generally accepted as "Greater Than" and "Less Than".  Perhaps if we view it as the "big" end (big sound) shrinking down to the little end (little sound: A > a) and the little end (little sound) expanding up to the big end (sound: a < A) if would make better sense.  Hey, it works in telescopes 8-)

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #13
You have to remember in most written languages rooted in western Europe, including musical notation, people read from left to right.

The > and the < illustrate what the sound volume does - the wide end of the hairpin indicates loud (big sound), and the narrow end or point indicates soft (small sound).

Here the sound is big on the left and small on the right: >.  Here there is a small sound on the left and a big sound on the right: <.  They show a picture of what is to be played; they are not comparisons like the math symbols.

These symbols usually stretch over a few notes, so they're like not the math symbols.  Lack of hairpins is a limitation of NWC, but the user font Crescendo, available on the Scriptorium, allows you to enter them as text.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #14
Ok, I get it.  Big end - big sound, little end - little sound.  I SEE THE LIGHT!!! The blinders have dropped from my eyes!!!  Oyez Oyez AMEN!!

(Thanks Fred) (G)

Have fun - The Hankster

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #15
..and then after (Thanks Fred) there should be (I'm sorry, Dick.)

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #16
Ok, I'm Sorry Dick.

(But I STILL think you are a member of the grammer police).

<(Grin getting larger) <G> (Grin getting smaller) >

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #17
.........There is a bait there he will be unable to resist.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #18
Sorry it took so long to "take the bait."
I've been playing "Hello, Dolly" all day (my chops are so shot...).
Grammer?  Grammer?  Check out your Dicktionary there, Hank.
And another thing - we wouldn't even need "Grammer Police" if everyone knew the language.  And it's not as if I go hunting for "grammer" errors.  I know 'em when I see 'em, simple as that.  And it does bother me that society in general seems not to care about the corruption (destruction?) of their language.  And before any states that "language is evolutionary," with which I do agree, it should not include a blatant disregard for spelling and usage.

Hey, isn't this a NoteWorthy forum?

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #19
Society ... seems ... their ???

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #20
You are correct Dick, this IS the NWC forum.  So why are you correcting me here for saying 'louder softer' instead of 'softer louder'???  I know mistakes when I see 'em too, but I don't feel the need to point them out to everyone.  Are you also into the 'Politically Correct' thing?  And for all you know I could have been referring to someone who watches their parents parents (Grammer and Grampa) and not the grammAr police. <G>.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #21
Hank, I don't "feel the need to point them out to everyone."  The original poster was given incorrect information, and that may have been confusing.  That's where I "felt the need" to correct an error.  Someone who is asking for help should not be given the wrong help.
And, Peter, ya got me on that one.  Sorry for the non-agreement of tense there.  I guess now I'll just go jump off the bridge, for I am imperfect...

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #22
Ok Dick, I surrender.  If I had listed each sign separately and said something like 'this means louder' and 'this means softer' you would be quite correct in your correction, but I was just indicating the louder,softer signs without trying to say which was which.  Never mind, I quit.

Have fun anyway - Hank

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #23
Oh okay but how is there a shortcut to add a trill (not thrill)to the staff.  I have 1.75 and I can't find it.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #24
The trill figure can be achieved through a workaround using the user fonts Boxmarks or Boxmark2.  Both have the trill designation "tr" with the squiggly line, and a second character which is just the squiggly line.

You can get these from the Scriptorium here http://nwc-scriptorium.org/

Load them as fonts, and then define one of the user font settings on the Page Setup tab to be this font.  Then when you want the sign, you enter text (x) and type in the appropriate letter, setting UserFont 1 or 2, etc.

Note this is for printing only since this is a text entry.  The playback won't be affected.  To achieve the playback effect, simply add another staff, copy everything to it, and where you want the trill, just replace the trilled note with the appropriate number of alternating sixteenth or thirtysecond notes.  Then hide all the notes in this playback staff, make sure to set the instrument and transpositions accordingly, then layer it with the staff you want printed.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #25
Then hide all the notes in this playback staff, make sure to set the instrument and transpositions accordingly, then layer it with the staff you want printed.
I just hide (Page Setup/Contents) the entire staff.

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #26
Do I have to "unzip" anything?

Re: thrill , getting louder , getting softer
Reply #27
I think so, but as long as you have a version of winzip on your computer, it's very easy to do.