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Topic: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export? (Read 586 times) previous topic - next topic

Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Thanks to everyone's help on this forum, I have learned a few strategies of preventing various problems concerning tempo changes when exporting .mid files.  However, I have a concert coming up, and I need to revise a bunch of very old scores really fast.  These scores are not very playable in their current state, since I never expected them to be performed live.

The scores have fermatas all over the place with various lengths, in addition to numerous tempo changes every several measures, some of which overlap with tempo markers, ritardandos, etc.  I made them that way because, at the time it was the easiest/fastest way to create the exact rubato I wanted.  I know this is a long shot, but is there a tool that can analyze all the tempo markers and fermatas in a .NWC file in one fell swoop and add everything up into a new staff with nothing but tempo markers in it?  Something that will reproduce whatever calculations determine the playback speed(s) on the fly in NWC.  I'm just hoping that this might be easier than it sounds, and I won't have to redo all the rubato from scratch.

This would, of course, be helpful for instances of importing into other programs, as well as cleaning up scores.

Thanks in advance to anyone who reads this!

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #1
Try creating a one line staff that would be layered into the next visible staff. It would contain all tempos and tempo variances as well as all rehearsal symbols. You can search for a tempo or tempo variance and move it to your top staff.
Since 1998

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #2
Try creating a one line staff that would be layered into the next visible staff. It would contain all tempos and tempo variances as well as all rehearsal symbols. You can search for a tempo or tempo variance and move it to your top staff.


OK, I guess I don't know how that works or how to do that!  Are you saying that the program already has a feature that will automatically move all of the tempo information, etc. onto a new staff?  If so, does it also move all the fermatas automatically?  I'm actually more concerned about the fermatas than I am about the tempos.  What I specifically want to do is convert the fermatas into tempos and be sure that they measure exactly the same as they do during playback in NWC.

For the moment, my only concern is getting all of it on one staff.  :)

Thanks so much for getting back to me!

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #3
First fill the top staff with whole rests, time signatures, and rehearsal symbols.
I don't know of any tool that does that, but you can go to the beginning of a staff and hit Cntl/F At the end of the "Find What" line is a small box with four dots. Click on it, then select Tempo or Tempo Variance.
When you find one, select it (if not done already) , Cntl/X on it and paste it upstairs. Hit F3 to repeat.
I used that in Spanish Dance recently.






Since 1998

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #4
If I got it right, I suppose the problem is that the fermate are not exported to MIDI but only operate when played by NWC.
N.B. The tempo changes are exported.
Well, it should not be too difficult to emulate them.

Each unit of delay of a fermata is 1/16 so you can put in the score, instead of a fermata (of course you can leave the gliph with delay set to 0), a hidden rest or a hidden tied note in each staff so as to restore the proper timing.

And, of course, no, I'm not aware of any tool for doing this automatically.

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #5
If I got it right, I suppose the problem is that the fermate are not exported to MIDI but only operate when played by NWC.
N.B. The tempo changes are exported.
Well, it should not be too difficult to emulate them.

Each unit of delay of a fermata is 1/16 so you can put in the score, instead of a fermata (of course you can leave the gliph with delay set to 0), a hidden rest or a hidden tied note in each staff so as to restore the proper timing.

And, of course, no, I'm not aware of any tool for doing this automatically.

That's correct!

If I got it right, I suppose the problem is that the fermate are not exported to MIDI but only operate when played by NWC.
N.B. The tempo changes are exported.
Well, it should not be too difficult to emulate them.

Each unit of delay of a fermata is 1/16 so you can put in the score, instead of a fermata (of course you can leave the gliph with delay set to 0), a hidden rest or a hidden tied note in each staff so as to restore the proper timing.

And, of course, no, I'm not aware of any tool for doing this automatically.

Sorry, do you mean it's the same length of delay as a 16th note of the same measure?

 

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #6
First fill the top staff with whole rests, time signatures, and rehearsal symbols.
I don't know of any tool that does that, but you can go to the beginning of a staff and hit Cntl/F At the end of the "Find What" line is a small box with four dots. Click on it, then select Tempo or Tempo Variance.
When you find one, select it (if not done already) , Cntl/X on it and paste it upstairs. Hit F3 to repeat.
I used that in Spanish Dance recently.








Just wanted to say that I enjoyed the song!  It's fun to look at another person's scores as well!

Thanks for all your suggestions!  These won't really be much faster than the way I was already going about it, unfortunately!

Re: Is there a way to convert fermatas into tempo markers before export?

Reply #7
Sorry, do you mean it's the same length of delay as a 16th note of the same measure?
I mean that the fermata delay is expressed in 1/16, as is clearly stated in the properties dialog.
Look at the attached screenshot.