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Topic: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano (Read 4755 times) previous topic - next topic

making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Hello, can anyone tell me, please, if there's a way of making the volume sustain when you have a series of tied semibreves, for example, when the instrument is the piano?
Thanks, in advance for any advice.

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #1
Not realistically. Pianos don't sustain, at least not well: the only energy into the system is the initial strike of the string by the hammer, unlike a violin where energy keeps being put in by the bow or a flute where it's put in by the player's breath. So piano sound decays rapidly. If you want a tone sustained over several tied semibreves, use a different instrument.

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #2
Thanks William, the reason I was asking is that I make part-enhanced practice midifiles for our choir, and I've found that members like piano as the instrument playing the notes, so I was wondering if there was some way of making the long notes sustain.  Now I know there is no way, I'll have to change the instrument.  Thanks again for your help.

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #3
Thanks William, the reason I was asking is that I make part-enhanced practice midifiles for our choir, and I've found that members like piano as the instrument playing the notes, so I was wondering if there was some way of making the long notes sustain.  Now I know there is no way, I'll have to change the instrument.  Thanks again for your help.

I apologize if I'm not addressing your question - but are you aware that you can add Pedal down/up marks to your score? Would that give you the sustain that you're seeking?

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #4
Mike, the sustain pedal (on a real piano) only holds the dampers off the strings so they will continue to ring as long as possible. It doesn't actually make the sound sustain any more than just holding down a single key would, which is what multiple tied semibreves call for. It DOES add some resonance due to sympathetic vibration of other strings in the piano - which is emulated by MIDI - so the sound is different from just holding a single note down. But it doesn't last any longer.

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #5
Thanks, Mike and William,  yes, I tried the pedal-down, but as you say, William, it didn't make the note last any longer.  Thanks for your help, anyway.

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #6
For what it's worth, I normally use an Oboe or Flute for simulated vocal lines when I want to hear the melody as if were being sung.

I know this isn't quite what you wanting, but perhaps it will help.  At least sustain will work correctly.

Otherwise why not try a violin or organ as the accompaniment?
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - gonna lern tubies next

Re: making long tied notes sustain when the instrument is the piano
Reply #7
Thanks Lawrie, I'll give it a try, and maybe bassoon for the tenor and bass.