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Topic: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug (Read 69903 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #100
The Handel example of a brace on a brace is just an old-fashioned variant of the Grand Staff on brace which appears in the Beethoven.  I can't say I'd lose too much sleep about not having it.

The single staff orchestral barace could be achieved in the same way as a single staff Grand Staff, that is layer an upper and a lower staff together.


Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #101
Lawrie, I must agree with bidderxyzzy here.
The great fun of barbershop music is that the performances are done without sheet music. That means that whenever barbershoppers meet, and if T-L-B-B (Tenor, Lead, Bari, Bass) are present, you can sing together - you know the words, the music, the works!
Never done it myself, but my wife has, for many years. As in the Newsgroup, I have been "Eagle Earing" the Noteworthy files for them. Many barbershop choruses in Holland use Noteworthy.
cheers,
Rob.

Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #102
G'day Rob,
oops, mustn't have been very clear - it was the 0.1% part of the comment I was referring to...  I reckon that, warts and all, NWC is getting this right more often than 0.1% of the time hence my remark that I feel he is exaggerating...
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - 'n I'm lernin' tubies now too

Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #103
   First, I never would consider a singer more computer savvy than I am "competition".  On the other hand, he is the last person to whom I would want to explain why I used an ugly kludge to get a desired result. 

   If you read back to my comment about adding braces and brackets graphically, you will see that I can get all the results in the previous post by Mr. Alberga just by setting no staff to orchestral, and invisibly fixing things in the print image.  Please note also, that only the  Thompson_Four_Saints.jpg actually uses a grand staff.  The first two use the curly brace in the same way that the third uses nested brackets, notation I have never seen for the obvious reason that the only time I look at a full orchestral score is when I need to take an opera or oratorio chorus and boil it down to four voices and something my conductor can turn into a piano accompaniment.  I don't pretend to be anything but an advocate for my subspecialty. 

   As far as "backward compatibility" goes, I think it very unlikely that fixing this problem would change the result of a successful kludge, except to make it unnecessary.  I leave it to the usual gadflies to provide a counterexample. 

Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #104
G'day bidderxyzzy,
First, I never would consider a singer more computer savvy than I am "competition".  On the other hand, he is the last person to whom I would want to explain why I used an ugly kludge to get a desired result. 

Ya never know - s/he might understand completely - or even have some better ideas!  :)

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<snip>
I don't pretend to be anything but an advocate for my subspecialty. 

Allsame the rest of us - but I do try to be open minded about others peoples needs and not simply focussed on my own.  This is not criticism BTW, just an observation.

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As far as "backward compatibility" goes, I think it very unlikely that fixing this problem would change the result of a successful kludge, except to make it unnecessary.  I leave it to the usual gadflies to provide a counterexample. 

I dunno...  Maybe it would, maybe not - it will depend entirely on the current code and how the putative change is impemented.  I imagine you are correct, but I don't know.

Ya know, I've never been called a gadfly before - do ya think i could get much altitude?  How hard would I have to flap my itty bitty wings?  I'm pretty heavy ya know, but I've always dreamt of being able to fly!   ;)
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - 'n I'm lernin' tubies now too

Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #105
Hmm.

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2 : a person who stimulates or annoys especially by persistent criticism
(Mirriam-Webster)

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1. A persistent irritating critic; a nuisance.
2. One that acts as a provocative stimulus; a goad.
(The Free Dictionary)

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2. a person who persistently annoys or provokes others with criticism, schemes, ideas, demands, requests, etc. 
  (Dictionary.com)

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"Gadfly" is a term for people who upset the status quo by posing upsetting or novel questions, or attempt to stimulate innovation by proving an irritant.
(Wikepedia)



Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #106
Aww shucks David - does that mean I won't be able to fly afterall?  ...  

<sigh> another dream gone...

;)
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals 'n youfonymums - 'n I'm lernin' tubies now too

Re: The Orchestral Staff Attribute Bug

Reply #107
G'day Rob,
oops, mustn't have been very clear - it was the 0.1% part of the comment I was referring to...  I reckon that, warts and all, NWC is getting this right more often than 0.1% of the time hence my remark that I feel he is exaggerating...
There's truth in that! The good thing is, together we have made a few points clear.
Sorry I misunderstood you.
cheers,
Rob.