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Topic: Digital way to key in the note (Read 2414 times) previous topic - next topic

Digital way to key in the note

Hello,
When I recall back to like 10 years ago when we 're in Indonesia, it seems that there is like a digital way to enter the note?, by make a copy of the song book, then we scan it at oou printer scan, than it will send like a fax to our Notewothy composer at our laptop.
Anyone knows about it?, because this is my problem now entering manually the note.

Changing the starting pitch is easy like explained here in this forum on how to transporse by Richard.

Thank you for any idea

Frank

Re: Digital way to key in the note

Reply #1
Hi, Frank -
I was hoping one of our true NoteWorthy experts would chime in here so I could learn about this as well, but until then, here's the best idea I have to offer.
MuseScore has a system where you can upload a pdf of your music and have it converted to MuseScore's format or (I think) to music xml.
Then you could use the niversoft online converter (https://www.niversoft.com/products/xml2nwc/) to get from music xml to NoteWorthy - or perhas OpaGust's NWCCONVERTOR (https://www.opagust.be/content/nwcconvertor).

I'm not aware of any way to go directly from a scan to NoteWorthy, but I would love to know about it if it exists.

best,
Charlie

Re: Digital way to key in the note

Reply #2
Years ago when I was investigating this I had some success with SharpEye.  I only used the 30 day trial version as at the time the purchase price was more than I was willing to pay.  This is still the case.

http://www.visiv.co.uk/

There is also Photoscore
https://www.neuratron.com/photoscore.htm

Scan in, export to MusicXML, import to NWC with Opagusts NWCCONVERTER tool
https://forum.noteworthycomposer.com/?topic=10142.0
I plays 'Bones, crumpets, coronets, floosgals, youfonymums 'n tubies.

Re: Digital way to key in the note

Reply #3
Well, Frank, I can tell a similar story.

I tried several times to scan scores - don't remember with which software -, but unless the score was really clear, the result was disappointing and I had to make many corrections.

My conclusion was that just keying in the notes manually is faster than the scan-option.
NWC is outstanding for keying in music and in my opinion no other software can compete with NWC. 

Finally I stopped looking for scanning options.

On the other hand, if you connect a midi keyboard to your computer, and you "play" your score, this may generate a midi stream which can be transformed into a score.
NWC or alternatives may provide good results, but since my piano skills are too limited, I was never able to compare several software options. And a lot of work may be needed to correct misinterpretations.

These days I always try first to find a midi-file for the score. Especially when people ask a score for a song they heard on the radio or on youtube. Sometimes I am successful, sometimes not. Using this starting point can save time (especially if a score has many staves/instruments).

Bart

Re: Digital way to key in the note

Reply #4
Lawrie mentioned Sharpeye and that it's expensive.  It is, but it's also good.  I use if frequently, particularly with big tasks (I recently extracted 28 instrumental parts from a 325 bar band score). 

Errors can be reduced if you scan at 600 dpi or higher, and of course, it helps if the original document is good.  If it's faded or uses archaic notation there may be more errors. 

Most Sharpeye errors are timing, where perhaps a triplet hasn't been recognized, or a rest is dropped or misread  Those can be found and fixed fairly easily in Sharpeye using a mouse.  Sharpeye flags those incorrect bars for you. 

Once you;ve opened the converted file in NWC, it's not hard to find and fix the remeaining errors.  Sometimes you'll see a 1-pixel red dot in a bar.  While it's hard to see, that's where you likely have to fix something.

Sometimes it's easier to make corrections within Sharpeye, other times, it's easiest to save the Sharpeye file with the errors, export the file to MusicXML and convert that to NWCTEXT, then fix the errors in NWC.

Bart  commented on the high music OCR error rate too.  I agree it's sometimes just easier to notate a single page of music note by note.

If your source music is a PDF file, some PDF programmes will allow the page(s) to be exported to black and white BMP or TIFF image files, which is what Sharpeye needs. 

Re: Digital way to key in the note

Reply #5
Using Sharpeye and converting it to NWCTXT in many cases results in using invisible notes to try to "fix" the problems.
I hate to have objects I can't see in the editor. It's very easy to forget them and it's very annoying to have to remove them by hand.
I solved the problem with:
Code: [Select · Download]
OCR clean = php\php.exe scripts\adp_GlobalMod.php Note,Pos==0z DELETE

Re: Digital way to key in the note

Reply #6
I'm with Bart. It's so nice to enter notes, chords, accidentals etc with NWC (a little less slurs and ties... :D ).
Lorenzo